Why can Stan Laurel use his thumb as a lighter in Way Out West?

Why can Stan Laurel use his thumb as a lighter in Way Out West? - Lighted Lighter

Why can Stan Laurel use his thumb as a lighter in Way Out West?

I know it's slapstick comedy but it just seems a bit random.



Best Answer

TV Tropes - Finger Snap Lighter:

One fun way of Playing with Fire is to coolly light your cigarette, cigar or pipe with a finger snap in an extravagant show of Mundane Utility.

[...]

Done by Laurel and Hardy in Way Out West (1937; probably the Trope Maker).

  • Stan ignites his thumb as if it were a cigarette lighter several times; each time, Ollie stares in disbelief and tries to copy him. And eventually it works for Ollie, who reacts with horrified alarm.

[Watch Clip on YouTube]




Pictures about "Why can Stan Laurel use his thumb as a lighter in Way Out West?"

Why can Stan Laurel use his thumb as a lighter in Way Out West? - Burning Lighter Close-up Photography
Why can Stan Laurel use his thumb as a lighter in Way Out West? - Tin vessels and metal bucket with milk placed near bike leaned on shabby rusty wall
Why can Stan Laurel use his thumb as a lighter in Way Out West? - Top view of miniature airplane placed on over gray world map with crop hand of anonymous person indicating direction representing travel concept



How did Stan Laurel flap his ears?

"Very simple," Laurel answered in his usual gracious fashion, "A thread is attached to each ear with adhesive tape, the threads extend to below camera level and are pulled back and forth at a camera speed of 8 or l2 frames per second. The threads are painted with opaque paint so they won't show in the scene."

What did Laurel and Hardy say?

Laurel and Hardy's best-known catchphrase is, "Well, here's another nice mess you've gotten me into!" It was earlier used by W. S. Gilbert in both The Mikado (1885) and The Grand Duke (1896). It was first used by Hardy in The Laurel-Hardy Murder Case in 1930.



Laurel and Hardy - Thumb lighter (Way out West 1937)




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