Why do both Batty and Kowalski talk about 'living in fear' and 'time to die' when fighting Deckard?

Why do both Batty and Kowalski talk about 'living in fear' and 'time to die' when fighting Deckard? - Side view of young woman in casual clothes sitting on sofa and talking while spending weekend together

Why do both Batty and Kowalski talk about 'living in fear' and 'time to die' when fighting Deckard in Blade Runner? Is it just a coincidence? Its just to tell that replicants are angry at living in fear and dying soon? I don't know how much of a coincidence it is, or in how many different ways this could have been said.

Kowalski

Batty


Best Answer

Replicants in the Blade Runner world are generally slaves. Especially the four who are on the run trying to just live.

With that said, Batty, the ring leader, likes to talk heady. Kowalski is represented a little dumb, literally supposed to be the muscle of the group. He is likely only repeating the things he heard: things Batty said to him to convince him to run, to find Tyrell, to find a cure.

Deckard is literally hunting down run away slaves with a dated kill switch, with the plan to kill them. Given the situation, and that Blade Runner is a Noir detective film its unsurprising the characters all talk about death and running in fear, its the theme of the movie.

Heady and repeated speeches are the norm.




Pictures about "Why do both Batty and Kowalski talk about 'living in fear' and 'time to die' when fighting Deckard?"

Why do both Batty and Kowalski talk about 'living in fear' and 'time to die' when fighting Deckard? - Parents Arguing in Front of a Child
Why do both Batty and Kowalski talk about 'living in fear' and 'time to die' when fighting Deckard? - Man And Woman Wearing Brown Leather Jackets
Why do both Batty and Kowalski talk about 'living in fear' and 'time to die' when fighting Deckard? - Happy diverse family talking to little girl on sofa indoors



How did Deckard and Rachel have a child?

She initially believed she was human, having possessed implanted memories belonging to Tyrell's niece. In addition to discovering her identity, she fell in love with Blade Runner Rick Deckard and conceived a child with him, but died as a result of the birth.

Why did Roy let Deckard live?

The first, and most obvious reason Batty spared Deckard's life is to demonstrate that he (Batty) understood the value of life, and what it meant to be \u201cgood\u201d, better than Deckard, the supposed protagonist of the story.

How did Batty die?

At the end of the movie, Roy Batty goes from being an apparently haywire maniac to being a Christ-figure. He pushes a symbolic nail through one of his hands before sparing Rick Deckard's life, and then he dies due to his expired time limit.

What kind of replicant is Deckard?

Paul Sammon, author of Future Noir: The Making of Blade Runner, has suggested in interviews that Deckard may be a Nexus-7, a new generation of replicant who possesses no superhuman strength or intelligence but does have neurological features that complete the illusion of humanity.




More answers regarding why do both Batty and Kowalski talk about 'living in fear' and 'time to die' when fighting Deckard?

Answer 2

The replicants, for all their strength and intelligence, are children.

They know they are getting close to death (4 year life span), and their fear is a driver for them (they are living in fear).

Batty is a combat model, a killer. In the instant when Deckard is hanging by his fingertips, Batty (who is dying, which we can see by his need to drive the nail through his hand to feel anything), realises there is a greater value in saving Deckard and allowing him to live, so reaches a more enlightened state where he is no longer "living in fear", and is prepared for his demise.

He faces death without fear ("time to die") becoming more human than many of the human characters in the movie.

Sources: Stack Exchange - This article follows the attribution requirements of Stack Exchange and is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

Images: Julia Larson, RODNAE Productions, Vera Arsic, William Fortunato